Jimmie Butler

Jimmie Butler is the founder of Timeless Agility and the author of the book Pursuing Timeless Agility: the Path to Lasting Agile Transformation. As a coach, he specializes in helping teams and organizations to be more effective by challenging and transforming cultural mindsets. He has worked across a variety of industries, including federal government, helping teams continuously get better at discovering and delivering the next right thing, sooner. Connect on LinkedIn | Order the Book | Learn More.

Blog: The 5 Questions to Better Solutions

Your teams’ work either addresses a problem or an opportunity. How they define them determines the solutions pursued. I want to challenge you to consider that perhaps they are not always solving the right problems, and therefore, not achieving the optimal outcomes. Five simple questions could change all that. Context …

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Blog: What if Government Programs Had Competition?

Do you know anyone that’s ever had a bad experience with a government program, website, or service? Poor user experiences aren’t isolated to government interaction, but government presents a distinct challenge that contributes to this problem – the service isn’t competitive. What if we managed them as if they were? …

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Blog: The #1 Thing Managers Should Do That They Don't

I have rarely met a manager that wasn’t swamped daily with meetings, emails, and fires to put out. If this is you, keeping your head above water is your primary objective day-to-day. Forget about being proactive, you can barely react to the unexpected, which occurs daily. This often requires early …

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Blog: Seeing Agile with 2020 Vision

Many people think of 20/20 vision as having exceptional, perhaps perfect, eyesight. What it actually means is one’s acuity (sharpness at distance) is normal relative to others. We determine how well we see based on how well most people see. Agile maturity tends to follow the same logic, but should …

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Blog: Applying First Principles Thinking to Problem Solving

I have a Beagle. His name is Charlie. This story of Charlie, and his bark, is going to help us think about our approach to problems and solutions. More specifically, this story about Charlie will help us see how easy it is to recommend the wrong (less optimal) solution because …

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Blog: 3 Reasons You're Missing the Point of Agile

Very few organizations need to be sold on Agile these days. It seems everyone has moved in that direction one way or another. The question is, are they going to Agile for the right reasons? The data1, as well as my experience, suggests that despite already “doing Agile,” many organizations …

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Blog: Resolving Conflict: Understanding the Root Problem to Solve

If you’ve ever worked outside of a high-performing team, you’ve seen all the symptoms of unhealthy conflict – such as undermining others, talking over people, and taking ownership of others’ ideas. For some, there is an insatiable appetite, a “need” even, to be right and to elevate themselves. When two …

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Blog - What Problem Are We Trying to Prevent?

Anyone that knows me is familiar with the question, “what problem are we trying to solve?” Whether it’s about the problem, or opportunity to capture, the point of asking that early in any discussion is to get folks off of thinking about solution and first onto why. In this post, …

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Blog: Quality Through Quantity

In the book, Art & Fear: Observations On the Perils (and Rewards) of Artmaking, a story is told of a ceramics teacher that ran an interesting experiment. He told half his students they would be graded solely on the quantity of their work. The more they produced, the higher their …

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